• All papers (assignments, worksheets, quizzes, whatever) submitted require name (first and last) and period designation. Those lacking will be 86ed. Assignments are routinely due at the beginning of the period. No credit for late or incomplete papers. Excessively wrinkled, frayed, and messy papers will also be denied credit. The instructor will not enable slipshod work. Instead, he encourages students to project themselves positively through their finished product, whether it's mowing the lawn or doing a history assignment.

  • Deadlines are deadlines. That's why they're called "deadlines." If they weren't really deadlines, they'd be called something else, like maybe "ideas" or "suggestions" or "garages" or "rockets" or "porridge." But deadlines aren't all those things; they're deadlines. Further, so-called "extensions" and "grace periods" are like lotteries—in the real world, people win lotteries every once in a blue moon, but that doesn't automatically make reliance on gambling as an income source a healthy behavior. Successful task completion within a measured time span is an indispensable skill to possess, both academically (now) and professionally (later).

  • The instructor is mindful of the various unexpected detours and speed bumps we all encounter in life. That's why students are offered, from time to time, mild opportunities to bolster or rescue (as the case may be) their points bank. Reciprocally, the instructor ain't perfect either. He might even forget a student's name or have a grumpy spell once or twice during the year. Life goes on, right?

  • Students are required to maintain some sort of repository notebook. It doubles as an organizational tool and a review device for upcoming exams. Stored within should be the shower of assignments, worksheets, hand-outs, and lecture notes pouring from the instructor's arsenal of education. Keep everything. The notebooks will be checked periodically. Naturally, any lack of content (big or little) would adversely affect the grade. Neatness and organization are also important considerations.

  • Near the beginning of each week, students should consider copying weekly lesson plans from the Website (perhaps into their notebook or planner) for future reference. The instructor makes a point of not only stating clearly the learning target at the outset of each day, but keeping the class posted regarding the approaching schedule for the next 4-5 days, as well. When absences of 1-2 days duration occur, students are expected to refer to this information rather than ask the instructor about what happened yesterday or what is scheduled for tomorrow. Do not pester the instructor for this information. In cases of extended absences over several days, consultation with the instructor is probably a smart idea.

  • The instructor is not an academic stalker and therefore will not hound students regarding make-up work. It is the responsibility of students to ascertain what activities were missed during absences (by paying attention when the instructor explains, checking on-line, and/or asking a classmate), and then complete the work and submit it in a timely manner. The instructor is rarely needed in the process unless an exam was administered during the absence.

  • Please label all make-up work. In addition to name and period, "MAKE-UP" should be boldly printed at the top of the first page, along with date(s) absent and a brief easy-to-translate assignment description (something like "Chapter 24 Notes" or "Great Depression Questions" would be fine). Improperly labeled make-up work receives no credit.

  • Per schoolwide policy, arrangements regarding assignments and tests should be discussed before scheduled absences (such as basketball games, band concerts, and so forth) occur. If not, the instructor has the option to reduce credit. Exams are announced several days in advance, therefore students present on the day of a test will do the test. Students arriving late to the classroom (after the exam process has begun) will not be allowed to partake. The format of make-up exams differs somewhat from that of at-large, in-class exams. Most make-up tests will be completed sometime other than during class—before school, after school, free period, lunch, other. The instructor does not answer questions on test days.

  • The educational pathway is a two-way street. Both the instructor and the student play important roles in the journey. Certain actions on the part of the student demonstrate unwillingness to embrace this relationship. Such actions include, but are not limited to, incomplete assignments, chronic tardiness, excessive absenteeism, and discourteous behavior.

  • The minute-by-minute, day-to-day classroom operation revolves around "Tubbs's 3 Rs" of respect, responsibility, and reality. The instructor believes that these principles are all-encompassing and therefore a giant list of 168 "dos and don'ts" is unnecessary. Students can create their very own personal list of good and bad behavior choices by following the process outlined below.

         Student: "Gee, I'm thinking of a specific behavior. I wonder can I do it?"
         Simple fail-safe solution: "Does my potential behavior violate one of the 3 Rs?"
         Easy answer #1: "No, it does not—then yes, I suppose I am free to do it."
         Easy answer #2: "Yes, it does—then no, I better choose smartly and not do it."


  • The flip-side to the "3 Rs" would be the "3 Evil Es"—enabling, entitlement, and excuses. The instructor is committed to offering a safe and productive classroom environment while fostering social responsiblity and personal growth, hence he does not permit the "3 Es" to become roadblocks to educational opportunity for his students.

  • The instructor places high value on certain self-conduct as a professional educator. Fairness is a top priority. All students are treated fairly regardless of any conceivable factor. No matter whether left- or right-handed, no matter whether short or tall, no matter whether athlete or singer, no matter whether Smith or Jones, no matter whether __________ or __________ (fill in the blanks as you wish), all students are forced to undergo fair treatment by the instructor.

  • Cheating, in all its various forms, is a no-tolerance situation. If it happens, no credit will be possible for the immediate item (assignment, worksheet, quiz, test, project, whatever). In addition, there will likely be another appropriate consequence at the instructor's descretion.

  • All class activities (read/study, lecture, worksheet, film, speaker, whatever) are deemed worthwhile by the instructor to achieve School District goals, satisfy Common Core objectives, maintain Pacing Guide schedules, fulfill Professional Learning Community standards, honor French Foreign Legion ideals, and on and on and on. Hence, any classroom disruption affects the educational process and is therefore not allowed. Problem moments will be solved by dismissal of student(s) from class accompanied by an automatic consequence of reduced credit for the day's activity/assignment. Hopefully, by the next day smiles will appear on everyone's faces and the classroom will overflow with good cheer.

  • Students are expected to bring certain items to class every day without exception. These are textbook, notebook, fully operational writing utensil, ID tag, respect for all, responsibility for self, and a sense of life's basic realities that affect us all. Failure to do so is interpreted by the instructor as a generally subversive spirit that hinders the learning process. That's bad karma. The probable consequence for the decision by any student(s) to come unprepared to class may be limited credit for the activity/assignment of the day.

  • Disregard for basic rules of acceptable behavior carries consequences. It's a simple concept. Your instructor is a simple person.

  • Students may dash to the bathroom anytime the need arises. This issue is best resolved between the individual student and Mother Nature. The instructor does not wish to be part of this intimate relationship. Please exit and re-enter the classroom in stealth-like fashion, respectful of the occuring activity.

  • Individual uniqueness is celebrated by the instructor and therefore honored in this classroom. At the same time, each class of 25-30 students must function within parameters appropriate for positive group dynamics. The fine line here will be determined by the instructor.

  • Grades are earned by the students, not awarded by the teacher. The convenient on-line gradebook is available for inspection 24-7 by students and parents. Students are encouraged to keep abreast of their scores and grades by checking the gradebook every so often. If score/grade issues arise, students are required to print their grade summary report as foundation for discussion/resolution. Due to extenuating circumstances, there might be a handful of days during which the gradebook would not be up-to-the-moment precise.

  • Grades are issued on an official basis every 3-4 weeks at Stevens High School. For interim grade inquiries, students and parents should view the on-line gradebook, which is the most up-to-date source (and the one that will serve as reference for the instructor if asked to provide a student's grade status at some random moment). Any lengthy conversation about grades between teacher and students will occur apart from the normal classroom. Due to confidentiality and right-to-privacy issues, the instructor will not engage in extensive discussion of grades via e-mail or telephone.

  • Parents are encouraged to visit the instructor during one or more of the designated teacher-parent conference times throughout the school year. Additional meetings can be arranged (almost always, within 24 hours) by contacting the instructor. Sudden appearances at the school in hopes of cornering the instructor run the risk of instructor unavailability due to already scheduled time.

  • Students are expected to make regular use of the Website. This includes routinely viewing the classroom's daily activities and inspecting the on-line gradebook. It is not unreasonable to expect students to hardcopy a small amount of Website material at home. Do not print items from the Website in the Stevens High School library.

  • Over the course of the school year, it is thinkable that students become ill. When this happens, please respect others by staying home to mend. Students with annoying coughs will be asked to leave the room and report to the office with the recommendation that they go home and remain until healthy.

  • Cellphones are cool. Microwave ovens also perform a really neat function, but toting one of them everywhere, opening/closing its door again and again, and constantly pushing the buttons from sunrise to sunset is over the top. In fact, compulsive operation of any machinery demonstrates an unhealthy reliance on inanimate objects as friends (and could create a potentially hazardous situation for people close by). The instructor does not want to see, hear, touch, smell, or taste any student cellphones in the classroom at any moment while he is alive. You use it, you lose it. On test days, all electronic devices (cellphones, iPods, shock collars, etc.) will be deposited in a common receptacle for the duration of the class period.

  • Outerwear items (coats, hats, waders, etc.) are not permitted in the classroom. Students who find the room generally chilly should wear sweaters or other heavier garments. Remember that campfires are prohibited except in USFS designated areas. Hooded sweatshirts are allowed so long as the hood is just a droopy chunk of cloth behind the head. When people have hoods pulled over their skulls they look like goblins. The instructor is scared of goblins.

  • Substitute teachers will appear from time to time. An extra dose of respect and responsibility is expected and appreciated. Remember, they are people too, just like skateboarders.

  • Extra help is readily available and joyously disseminated at numerous times during the day. Occasionally, after-hours review sessions are scheduled. The instructor has also arranged some academically beneficial out-of-classroom opportunities for "early-release" Wednesday afternoons.

  • Harassment in any form, including sexual, racial, and religious, is a no-tolerance issue. The instructor is repulsed by such conduct.

  • Whining is absolutely verboten.

  • Besides cheating, harassment, and whining, certain other items are expressly taboo in the classroom. These things include naps, music-playing devices, playing cards, fingernail polish, all projectiles (including darts and paper airplanes), communism, spearmint-flavored gum/candy, dirty laundry, car batteries, reptiles, criticizing the instructor's wardrobe choices, and anything imported from New Jersey. Additional items TBA as necessary.

  • Please tuck backpacks, U-Haul boxes, and other cumbersome bundles out of the walking aisles so the instructor doesn't feel as though he's hiking through the Black Hills when he tries to make way between student desks.

  • Students should refrain from writing on the desks. There are three good reasons for this rule: one, the instructor doesn't want any writing on the desks; two, the desks aren't your property to deface; and three, you're not in third grade anymore. The exception to this rule would be anytime you wish to spend some of your free time cleaning the classroom's desk tops.

  • Black is beautiful and orange is awesome. Together they make powerful medicine honored by all kind spirits throughout the universe. Wear them often and experience the magic they will bring to your life.

  • The instructor strongly desires the classroom to be a safe and comfortable oasis in the vast SHS desert. If some sand gets in your eyes or your camel ventures off course, please talk to the instructor. He has candy.

  • The instructor dutifully checks incoming e-mail during each workday and realizes that all senders want timely responses. When reading new e-mails, the instructor does not rush into immediate reply like a dog lunges for a piece of bacon. E-mails do not automatically take precedence over other worthy tasks; there is usually a certain "wait-in-line" process which is fair and reasonable. Please refrain from using emoji—they can trigger an allergic reaction for the instructor. Except in absolute emergency situations, the instructor does not welcome telephone calls at home.

  • God Bless America.

  • The instructor is a trustworthy person. He promises to never knowingly deceive you. He has no hidden agendas relative to the classroom. What you see is what you get. So you can trust that all of the aforementioned stuff will transpire as described. The instructor is not a proponent of endless warnings and constant reminders.

  • The instructor is professionally obligated to follow all mandates of the school administration. No classroom policies, expressed or implied, including those listed above, can supercede any rules and regulations of Stevens High School itself or the School District in general. If you believe that any of the instructor's guidelines stated herein clash with higher authority policy, please feel free to seek clarification.

  • This material can be accessed on-line at www.APUSH-XL.com/ClassroomProtocol for continuous future reference by students and parents. See www.APUSH-XL.com/InstructorInfo if you care to know more about the instructor. "Twelve Questions to Never, Ever, Ever, Ever—Even in Eleventy Billion Years—Ask Mr. Tubbs" is available at www.APUSH-XL.com/BadQuestions.

  • Please sign and date this document somewhere in the available space directly below. This action indicates agreement (knowledge and compliance) with all of the aforementioned items. If you have questions or concerns, now rather than later would be the appropriate time to contact the instructor for further explanation.